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The ThinkGeo Blog Posts

Make a Web Mapping App with Routing and Place Search: Tutorial

“We’ve got a long way to go and a short time to get there”; an excerpt from Jerry Reed’s classic record “Eastbound and Down”. Within those lyrics resides a deeper story of managing time and distance across the roads of America. There were no data hubs in Jerry’s days of trucking and fleet management. There were no ways of saving time beyond those that could be thought up on a whim.

The infrastructure now is much different of course. In today’s world, knowing the road that lies ahead is essential for business efficiency across several industries. Continue reading

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Applying a Directional Styling in a WPF Application

This ThinkGeo WPF ApplyDirectionPointStyleForLineStyle functionality for .NET Core will guide you through drawing lineStyles in the form of directional arrows on a map. The direction Point can be an image or a glyph, it not only rotates the icon across the angle of the road, but also provides a way to customize the rotation of the direction point. The arrows highlighted in the red circle in the following screenshot are customized based on the line’s attributes. This sample supports ThinkGeo UI for WPF version 12.0 and higher. Continue reading

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Using “ClassBreak” styling to create dynamic maps

In this project you will see how to use the ClassBreakStyle to group and render features by values. ClassBreakStyle is a useful technique as it allows you to group various features by the specified values, then applies differently style to the feature groups. One of the first steps in creating an interactive map that highlights different classes of data is creating unique iconography to translate that onto the map.

For a hands-on demo of the code please visit the ThinkGeo Github page and download the sample today. Continue reading

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Using WPF “TextStyling” with ThinkGeo UI

When you think of displaying points on a map, usually you think of representing them with symbols or icons. ThinkGeo’s PointStyle class is typically employed here, but what if you have a font containing symbols you want to use? In our ThinkGeo’s latest sample available on GitHub, we demonstrate how to do exactly that, using the TextStyle class instead of PointStyle. For the symbol font, we’re using our own Map Icons Web Font which you can download and use freely in your applications, or you can load your own custom .ttf font file if you prefer. Continue reading

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Video Spotlight: Getting Started with ThinkGeo UI 12 & WPF

ThinkGeo UI WPF for .NET Core takes GIS application development for the Windows desktop to a whole new level, with a .NET Core-native control that packs the full power of Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF). With blazing fast rendering performance, powerful mapping features and support for the most popular data formats, ThinkGeo UI Desktop WPF for .NET Core makes GIS accessible to developers of any skill.

In this video, we’ll walk you through how to create an interactive map in a WPF desktop application using ThinkGeo UI Desktop for WPF. Continue reading

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Video Spotlight: Getting Started with ThinkGeo UI 12 & Blazor

With the release of ThinkGeo UI 12, we’ve had a lot of interest in the new Blazor map component introduced with it. Today we’re offering a look at how to add a map to your Blazor web application in just a few lines of code.

Part 1 of our ThinkGeo UI Blazor video series walks you through adding a ThinkGeo Cloud base map to your Blazor app using Visual Studio Code on MacOS.

Following on from there, we’ll show you how to overlay a ShapeFile feature layer on top of your base map and apply a style to it. Continue reading

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ThinkGeo UI 12 Arrives with .NET Core 3.0 & Blazor Support

ThinkGeo and .NET Core, together at last!

Say hello to the all-new ThinkGeo UI 12.  Powered by .NET Core 3.0, our new map controls are modern, cross-platform, fast, and packed with features like Blazor support and cloud integration.  Our full suite of ThinkGeo UI 12 products is available right now — read on to discover what’s new.

Break Free with .NET Core 3.

Step beyond the classic .NET Framework and Windows-centric projects. ThinkGeo UI 12’s interactive map controls and SDKs have been rebuilt from the ground up on the platform-agnostic .NET Core version 3. Continue reading

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ThinkGeo Maps Query Sample Spotlight: Cities Affected by Nuclear Disasters

The settlements affected by Chernobyl’s 1986 nuclear accident

There have been a handful of nuclear power plant events that have had significant consequences for people, the environment and the facilities and workers of the plant. Sometimes the scope and radius of the area impacted by these events is minimized or not completely understood. Maps can help in painting that picture. ThinkGeo Cloud can go the extra mile and stress the importance and the magnitude of such events.

ThinkGeo’s Maps Query Service can be used in a near-limitless variety of applications, but for this use case we wanted to show off the ease of putting a map together that focuses on finding points within a custom area shape. Continue reading

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Routing Cost Matrix API added to ThinkGeo Cloud

Natural disaster relief teams need to know how far they have to go and how long they will be traveling

Sometimes getting from point A to point B just isn’t enough. Sometimes there are points C-Z to factor into consideration and if that’s the case then odds are you need to know how long it’s going to take to get there too. Enter ThinkGeo’s Routing Cost Matrix API. This latest addition to our ThinkGeo Cloud arsenal introduces a simple service that calculates the time and/or distance between several waypoints. Continue reading

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Maps Query Service added to ThinkGeo Cloud

Cities affected by a threatening Atlantic Hurricane

ThinkGeo’s Cloud Maps Spatial Query Service is a data allocation haven. With it, you can free-draw, set lines and/or polygon contours for any portion of ThinkGeo’s World Maps and then extract a bevy of spatially-related data. For example: if your input shape contains waterways, buildings, railways, points of interest, etc., you can
query them and get instant highlighted results from your search. Through our demo center, users can experiment with a variety of layers and query types to customize their experience and they can even set their max results to a custom value. Continue reading

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